Toribash
Hello again

Originally Posted by Dare View Post
Interesting, I did not know the police officer have that right with speeding 0_0

But previously when I mean speeding analogy with black lives matter, I'm connecting them due to the fact that when a police officer does something (like speeding or in this case harm to a civilian), nothing happens or nothing usually can be done at that moment in time because the cop thinks he/she is doing the right thing. To civilians it's hard to counter-argue against police officers because many of them think "what's the point, the police can make up some bs and ticket/arrest you or not even listen to you at all. Then it turns into a hassle, of going to court, etc.".

So I think personally there's this massive pre-emptive view that complaining about the Police will get you nowhere. We worry at every job we go to about complaints, as it's the fastest way out of your job, and you can get them for doing what you think is the right thing at the time.
I get that some Police may 'shoo you away' because we aren't really used to people helping out, they are normally just gathering around to get in the way or to cause a scene. What you think is right may be completely different to what that Police officer thinks is right- and usually we come with the training and experience to back it up. That's not intended to be cocky, but if a electrician (for example) went up to a doctor and told him he is treating that patient wrong, he would probably also tell you to go away, however right you thought you were.
Part of it as well, at least in my view, is that in the Police, you have to make many fast time decisions that could ultimately end in things going seriously wrong. What is even worse though, is when you don't make a decision at all- you will not even make it through training. The job is about believing in yourself, because if you don't believe in what you are doing, then everyone around you won't believe in you either. That air of confidence is critical to the job which is likely why it is so prevalent.


Now, this is where the issue of the training comes in and as you said it's "crammed and you learn on the job" and as a result I'm sure many police officers try to make there life easier or learn "wrong" during the job to a point they're unethical. To an extent this could be true for some police officers. But dont get me wrong, there are many great cops out there.

So, theres two categories for people who stretch the boundaries of the job. You have the people that do it to 'make their life easier' and you have the people that do it, as it is equally effective whilst still allowing you to get on to the next job, where someone elses life is at risk. The people who do it to make their life easier very quikcly go amuck.
I admit, on shift, I shortcut many things- the biggest one being a thing called 'Officer Discretion'. In short, if a crime is reported to a police officer in person, and they don't deem it necessary to be raised, it won't be raised. Seldom do we really get to do this anymore, but at the end of the day it's still a shortcut. The only time we will never ever ever shortcut is with safeguarding.


In my opinion the police force is necessary for the stability of society, however the current system is very flawed and needs changes.

One more question, been always curious about this. Does a cop need to meet a certain quota each month or year? Like giving a certain amount fo tickets or reaching a certain total value of tickets given.
I can't speak for the entire UK, as I can't with most things, but in our jurisdication- no, definititively 100% no, nada, never. I can't think of anything more corrupt and wrong.


Originally Posted by iTemp View Post
As a cop and a kid comes up to u and asks you to help him tie his shoe would u do it
If I was granted the time to stand around and do nothing, then most likely yes
what about walking a granny across the street
Most likely yes
and the most important question of them all how much time do you spend on toribash playing
Not a lot at all anymore unfortunately, I don't get a huge amount of freetime for gaming anymore

Originally Posted by Shmevin View Post
Thank you for your service. o7
Thanks man

Originally Posted by fudgiebalz View Post
i'll ask the basic bitch questions

- weirdest call you've answered?
[REDACTED] Sorry
- any repeat 'customer' stories?
You'd be scarily surprised how many of our customers are repeat.

Originally Posted by Creati0n View Post
Removed a couple low quality posts and placed some infractions. I really do think this is an interesting topic, and I love to see some awesome questions and answers flowing through here.

@trollers: don’t shitpost, just this once.

May come back to make a couple questions of my own later. Cool thread.

Thanks for the help and support!

Originally Posted by Fire View Post
Have you ever been in a gunfight?
Not thus far, we're normally pretty clued up on it, and there isn't a huge firearm supply in our area. Generally we'll know and firearms trained officers will attend instead.

Answers in bold text inside their respective quotes as above
Last edited by QuestionTime; Sep 25, 2020 at 12:44 PM.
Heyo. Would like to first say that I live in the UK so I thank you for your service.

I have a question about the recent rule of 6 that has been passed.
Do you actively enforce the rule when walking about and seeing a group of more than 6? If so how do you ensure that they don't do again? Is it a warning and a punishment later on if they are seen to be doing it again or how does it work?


And if you don't do that, who enforces this rule?


Thank you
ishi - "I'm Hampa's Bitch Slappin' Hand"
I'm so proud Sparky
How true is the "oi mate you got a loicense for that" stereotype and where does it originally came from?
:D
Hi I have some questions.

1. One of my sister's ex boyfriends began work in the London Met and he very quickly adopted a derogatory attitude towards the homeless. Is this something you consider common within the police force? The attitude seemed reinforced by the people he worked with, and the general attitudes of those around him but I'm curious as to how pervasive that actually is. And if it is the case, do you think this is acceptable, or should there be a shift in this attitude?

EDIT: I remembered another question I had.
1.5. As a kid I also remember considering the police force as a career path, and even looked into bomb defusal within the armed forces, but found myself unable to properly commit to those paths due to a conflicting moral compass. Are there any areas that you find yourself disagreeing with the law, and how do you reconcile those differences? It's something I was never able to get past, and obviously the law should never be used as a moral guideline, but the older I get the more strongly I feel on this issue.

2. When you look at the American situation with regards to race relations within the police force, do you find yourself comparing it to the UK? It is my view that the UK is no less systemically racist, but we're much better at pretending it's not there. Would you agree or disagree with that statement, and do you have any experiences relevant to it?

3. My last question is slightly more impromptu due to the sad news this morning. (For those of you not in the UK, a 23 year old police officer was shot in Croydon, and then the gunman killed himself.) What is your first thought when reading a news story like this? A gut reaction, I mean. In addition, I read this statistic on the BBC article I read on it:
However, Tasers are increasingly a common sight in the UK - and a massive survey of police officers recently found three-quarters would carry one of the less-than-lethal devices on the frontline, if given the choice.

What are your thoughts on this? Do you feel that Tasers are necessary for officers to do their jobs? Do you think the training in the UK is adequate for the use of tasers?
Another interesting article on the issue is here, that I'd be interested in hearing your thoughts on. This link is specifically to the statistics involving taser related deaths and the studies therein: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-494059...e%20of%20death

Thanks for your time
Last edited by Erth; Sep 25, 2020 at 12:18 PM.
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Originally Posted by Saku View Post
How does your career affect your private life (such as mental health)?

It's the simple things. I sometimes think I'm over cautious, but it's things that I mostly inadvertently do For example:
  • I tend to avoid visiting areas that I Police, for fear of being recognised by a violent nominal
  • I'm constantly checking my back when walking or driving around, particularly when leaving or entering the police station for fear or people following me.
  • As a follow up to the above, I tend to take a round-a-bout route away from my home before then driving to it, to avoid being followed or tracked. This is mainly due to death threats I recieve for myself, my friends and my family.
  • Social Media is a no-no
  • I tend to only ever sit in corner seats, or seats with a wall behind me, out of paranoia (this annoys the hell out of my partner)
  • I'm often getting counselling in some form or another, after seeing children taking their life or mangled, decayed dead bodies. I almost had a long bout of PTSD where I likely would have had to medically retire from the job, that I fortunately managed to tackle before it got the better of me.
  • You never really get to stop being a Police Officer, and so you're constantly on the lookout for crime and feel duty bound to get invovled if something happens
  • Any of your holiday could get cancelled with 24 hours warning, even if you're in another country.
  • On the bright side, it's fun walking down the street and knowing how many criminals there are, whilst everyone else is clueless to it.
    This is just a few of the things that I can think of off the top of my head.

Originally Posted by Ele View Post
Run us through your typical work day, wakeup to end of shift

Good question, but very very difficult to answer this. Every day is completely different, and so I never really have a set pattern, but I usually start the day for a run with my dog, workout, breakfast, shower and hygiene, gets changed into half blues (Wicker shirt, trousers, socks boots) and then a coat over the top to hide the uniform, pack some food and then head out, aiming to arrive about 40 minutes before the shift starts. This allows me time to kit up, task my vehicle, check my currently investigated crimes, and have a look at briefing and taskin (BAT) which is our system with information and guidance on the day/night ahead and things to note. From there, it is a free for all till the end of the shift. If I get any free time, I will patrol my favourite crime hotspots and disrupt as much crime as possible, otherwise I will be attending 999/101 calls, dealing with detained prisoners is custody or completing paperwork.
We have set start and end times, but these don't really exist and you're normally working around 2-3 hours more.

Originally Posted by Goomba View Post
Have people tried to flirt with/bribe you, have you ever accepted?

Yes, loads and no. We're not even allowed to accept a cup of tea when we go to peoples houses, as it can be seen as a form of bribery (not that I'd want to from most of the houses we visit) and we aren't meant to accept gifts to the force from people, i.e. homemade cakes from the primary school (but as long as we don't tell the bosses, its all good).

We have bribes in all forms, usually money, as being a Police Officer doesn't pay particularly well, but I just couldn't bring myself to do it.

Originally Posted by Stone View Post
Heyo. Would like to first say that I live in the UK so I thank you for your service.

I have a question about the recent rule of 6 that has been passed.
Do you actively enforce the rule when walking about and seeing a group of more than 6? If so how do you ensure that they don't do again? Is it a warning and a punishment later on if they are seen to be doing it again or how does it work?


And if you don't do that, who enforces this rule?


Thank you

You're welcome, thank you for choosing the best country to live in.

Personally, I've never had the opportunity to enforce it, it's seldom called in, and our force policy is to fine as the final option. 'Communication Education and Persuasion' or something like that should be used first to try and talk people into disbanding, if not then yes they'd be fined.
We'd also take details of everyone there, and if their name keeps popping up, then they'd likely also recieve a fine.
As far as I'm aware, we don't issue the price of the fine, and there isn't a set value- that's all established at court.

Originally Posted by basic View Post
is it true that all cops are bastards or did twitter lie to me?

That's a decision for you to make

Originally Posted by Melon View Post
can u do a flip

If you mean the gymnastic one, then yes! But not in police uniform, I tried it once.

Originally Posted by Trocher3 View Post
How true is the "oi mate you got a loicense for that" stereotype and where does it originally came from?

The sterotype predates my time as a Police Officer, and I guess it probably came from the same place as 'ELLO ELLO ELLO, WHATS ALL THIS THEN' and a bit of exaggerated cockney dialect.

Originally Posted by Erth View Post
Hi I have some questions.

1. One of my sister's ex boyfriends began work in the London Met and he very quickly adopted a derogatory attitude towards the homeless. Is this something you consider common within the police force? The attitude seemed reinforced by the people he worked with, and the general attitudes of those around him but I'm curious as to how pervasive that actually is. And if it is the case, do you think this is acceptable, or should there be a shift in this attitude?

The metropolitan police is a different world to policing in any other part of the country, they do things differently to almost every other force. It is very difficult for me to comment of their behalf.
I can only assume that view came from the general fact that most of the homeless, at least in our area, are also the ones commiting crimes. I personally like to check up on the homeless in the area, as there are some fantastic diversion teams that can assist them. I understand the frustration when people don't accept the help though.


EDIT: I remembered another question I had.
1.5. As a kid I also remember considering the police force as a career path, and even looked into bomb defusal within the armed forces, but found myself unable to properly commit to those paths due to a conflicting moral compass. Are there any areas that you find yourself disagreeing with the law, and how do you reconcile those differences? It's something I was never able to get past, and obviously the law should never be used as a moral guideline, but the older I get the more strongly I feel on this issue.

I'm yet to find myself disagreeing with the law so to speak, I feel my morals would keep me true to my colours, regardless of what the law says, and so maybe it is my ignorance to this that means I've never noticed the discrepancies. I'm not sure if I'm the same as everyone else- but this is just my personal view.
I do have moments of frustration, but this is normally more with policy, the justice system beyond the police, or certain individuals that get on my back, rather than the law.


2. When you look at the American situation with regards to race relations within the police force, do you find yourself comparing it to the UK? It is my view that the UK is no less systemically racist, but we're much better at pretending it's not there. Would you agree or disagree with that statement, and do you have any experiences relevant to it?

Touchy subject at the moment, so I shall proceed with some caution, but I also want to state my opinions.
I spoke to a male, who happened to be black the other day. He was complaining about my colleague (who is very new to the job) being very full on, aggressive and absuing his powers. I must admit, from watching the scenario play out, I agree that it was handled poorly, but I wanted the colleague to learn the lesson in a controlled environment.
I had a long chat with the male after the fact, and he was stating that my colleague had to realise his perspective. He said words to the effect of "I DON'T DOUBT THAT YOU OR YOUR COLLEAGUE ARE NOT RACIST, AND THERE IS PROBABLY NO-ONE ON YOUR TEAM THAT YOU KNOW TO BE RACIST, BUT AS A BLACK MALE WHO HAS BEEN DISCRIMINATED AGAINST BY POLICE IN THE PAST, AS A COMMUNITY, WE DON'T KNOW WHO THE RACIST ONES ARE AND ARE NOT. THIS IS WHY WE STEREOTYPE, BECAUSE WE CAN NEVER BE SURE- AS YOU WOULD STEREOTYPE A DRUG DEALER TO BE ARMED WITH A WEAPON OF SOME SORT. 9/10 DEALERS MIGHT HAVE NO WEAPON ON THEM, BUT YOU ASSUME THEY DO, TO ENSURE THAT YOU STAY ON THE SAFE SIDE, YOUR COLLEAGUE NEEDS TO THINK ABOUT THIS BEFORE HE TREATS SOMEONE LIKE THAT AGAIN.
To be honest, I thought I also needed to hear that, as it is a fantastic point. I often take race relations too personally, thinking to myself that I'm just a human being, and people should treat me like that. But I'm also a human being that represents a large, and at times controversial, organisation.
I can't say I'd ever compare the situation in the US to the UK, as it is incomparable, they are two different machines completely. I feel that systemic racism is the wrong term, as it implies that we are trained to oppose a certain race. This is completely incorrect, should not be used to describe the fact that black males are stop and searched more often, which is directly backed up by the fact that black males are much more likely to be involved in crime- this, in my opinion, is not systemic racism, police officers are not trained to see a black person and subsequently search them or arrest them for that reason- police officers are trained to see suspicious circumstances, or circumstances that warrant a check, and to act upon that. The fact that this happens more often to black people, as they are factually more involved in crime, is irrelevant to systemic racism.


3. My last question is slightly more impromptu due to the sad news this morning. (For those of you not in the UK, a 23 year old police officer was shot in Croydon, and then the gunman killed himself.) What is your first thought when reading a news story like this?

I hesitate to react immediately, without any context of the incident, but my first question was how he was able to pass a search out of custody without a firearm being found. This is just a gut reaction A gut reaction, I mean. In addition, I read this statistic on the BBC article I read on it:

What are your thoughts on this?

I have been informed of the full circumstances of what has happened from colleagues (word travels fast) and I will not be saying anything about this until there has been a public release. My main thoughts to be honest are with the friend's and family of this lad, and it's a bit of a kick up the arse to keep on your toes at all times.

Do you feel that Tasers are necessary for officers to do their jobs?

Yes, definitely, I think there should be more tasers rolled out in all areas of the country.

Do you think the training in the UK is adequate for the use of tasers?

Yes, definitely

Another interesting article on the issue is here, that I'd be interested in hearing your thoughts on. This link is specifically to the statistics involving taser related deaths and the studies therein: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-494059...e%20of%20death

A really important part of this article, is that none of these deaths have been solely and directly related to the use of TASER in the incidents. Yes it has been linked, but TASER alone doesn't actively kill people.
The bit about use of force as well- Pulling PAVA (Incapacitant spray) from it's holster is not always considered a USE OF FORCE, however simply having your hand on the taser, or having it unholstered in any position (behind your back, tucked in your belt etc.) it considered a USE OF FORCE, and is documented as one.
Also worth noting that 'un-armed' officers (I use this in apostrophes as PAVA is legally a Section 5 Firearm which suggests all officers are actually armed) are, by policy much much less likely to be sent to a job involving weaponry, or particularly violent jobs, which would warrant a use of force. It seems likely very silly statistics, used without context to rile people up. For the black people vs white people statistics, see my response on systemic rasicm above


Thanks for your time

As usual, see above